The Inspire Fund was designed to empower creative projects that engage the public with the topic of dementia and educate about our pioneering research to find a cure for this heartbreaking condition.

Alongside our world-leading medical research, we strive to achieve a better understanding of dementia across all walks of life. Lack of awareness and understanding, stigma, and a lack of effective treatments, have combined to mean people have been reluctant to engage with the topic or come forward for a diagnosis.

With the scheme open to a wide range of people, including researchers, artists and creatives, community groups and cultural spaces, every application brings fresh and innovative thinking.  Since 2019, the Inspire Fund has awarded 26 projects, totalling an investment of £405,399.27.

When the Inspire Fund was established, the concept was to create a fund that would award grants to support a broad and varied portfolio of innovative projects, including hands-on workshops and demonstrations, short films and animations, dance and theatre productions and art and photography. Through these creative ventures, we would empower members of the public to start those all-important conversations about dementia.

Over the three rounds, the schemes criteria has evolved to align it to strategic areas of work for ARUK.

 

 

In 2019 we funded eight projects totalling £98,974

Projects had to meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • Inform the public about dementia, including challenging misconceptions.
  • Build awareness of dementia and ignite action for change.
  • Engage and inspire the public with the progress being made in dementia research.

 

In 2021 to improve diversity and representation the criteria were refreshed to focus on engagement in underserved communities, on the topic of brain health and about biomedical dementia research.

 

 

In 2021 we funded ten projects totalling £149,375.

Projects had to meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • Engage with underserved audiences, including minority ethnic communities, marginalised or socioeconomically disadvantaged people.
  • Build knowledge and engage the public with the topic of brain health.
  • Engage and create dialogue with people about the progress being made in biomedical dementia research.

 

 

In 2022 we funded ten projects totalling £157,049

Each project had to engage with underserved audiences on the topic of dementia, such as minority ethnic communities, marginalised or socioeconomically disadvantaged groups.

Also meet one or more:

  • Build knowledge and engage the public with the topic of brain health, in the context of dementia risk reduction.
  • Engage and create dialogue with people about the progress being made in biomedical dementia research.
  • Highlight the value of research volunteers and reduce barriers to research participation.

 

Each project has been influential in helping to dispel myths about dementia, improve understanding of the importance of brain health and help showcase how research is working to overcome this heart-breaking condition.