Recorded dementia cases in England increase 62% in seven years

Newly-released figures suggest that the number of recorded cases of dementia in England has risen 62% in the last seven years.

Posted on 30th July 2014

Newly-released figures from the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) suggest that the number of recorded cases of dementia in England has risen 62% in the last seven years. Provisional figures released today show that 344,000 people in England had a diagnosis of dementia in 2013/14 – up from 213,000 in 2006/7, the first year that data was collected. The provisional figures also suggest an 8% rise in the number of recorded dementia cases since 2012/13.

Hilary Evans, Director of External Affairs at Alzheimer’s Research UK, said:
“These new statistics do not tell us how many people are living with the condition in total as not every case is currently diagnosed, but they do give us some idea of the scale of the challenge in England. This report does not set out to investigate the reasons for the rising figures, but it’s likely that recent moves to improve dementia diagnosis rates, along with an ageing population, will have contributed to this increase.

“Dementia is one of the most feared conditions for many, but an accurate and timely diagnosis can be important for people to be able to access support and existing treatments – as well as helping people to make sense of the symptoms they are experiencing. These latest figures further underline the urgent need for better treatments to help the hundreds of thousands of people who are affected by this devastating condition.”

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